Sad Alien Climbing Extended Review

I was intrigued by this bold new contender to the climbing training equipment crowd when given the opportunity to put a BETA test unit through its paces and incorporate it into my regular training regime.

First impressions were good; the build quality is a cut above others with professional CNC production methods ensuring every unit is perfect and identical. The chunky plywood unit is the ideal size for installing above doors as would be the case for the majority of board owners without the luxury of a training room. The pre-drilled mounting holes could have been chamfered to add a neat little finishing touch, and give the satisfaction of the screws sitting flush once in, the mass production units may well have this feature. Once installed the unit was solid.

The innovative modules for the unit, crafted from yellow poplar, are incredibly comfortable and versatile; the ease at which modules can be swapped out or rotated in 45deg increments is inspired. The precise cut of each module attachment point gave a very snug fit but I never found myself fighting to get one in or out. Often a good wiggle followed by a good slap to seat it fully was all I needed. After a good few months of use I would assume that modules slide in and out effortlessly whilst remaining bomber. With 5 slots in width to play with it suits every climber size, for other boards you’re limited by hold position and must change your workout accordingly. The production models come with 1×3 slots, 1×5 slots and 2×5 slots giving plenty of room to experiment with, the model I had was 1×5 and allowed for plenty of creativity, the 2×5 offers greater potential for offset hangs and reps to better train one-sided weaknesses. The Alien unit gives you freedom to train all hold types exactly at the width you need. From the short play I had on the Red Spider BETA station’s peg modules I assumed that I would be able to attempt some pegboard style campus, moves but they were too snug and to release one whilst locked off on another was too much of a fight to make it a practical peg board replacement. I have been assured that this has been improved in the production modules.

I love the ability to rotate the modules; this is where the unit truly sets itself apart from the market. Competitor boards only allow for training the same few muscle groups in a particular way. Suddenly having the freedom to turn flat 1-pad crimps into opposing gastons changes everything – you work so much harder to maintain good form, the form needed to climb hard. It gives a more complete upper body workout simply by rotating modules. I found that hanging/repping from the top of the unit itself with all modules removed was also comfortable and would negate the need to replicate a similar extra-deep module – cheeky money saver allowing you to purchase the more ‘advanced’ modules.

The rounded slopers unassumingly sculpted into the bottom side of the juggiest-jug module are a new offering in the training board market instead of the usual flat-angled sloper and present an excellent challenge for those all too common rounded holds outside, ideal for the 2019 Easter trip to Font!

The deep 4 finger pocket with 15deg sloper on the flipside are ideal for the latter stage of a warm up – I did find that my pinky finger had a bunching of skin at the joint in contact with the hold but I put that down to the callouses grown from endlessly tailing ropes whilst instructing. I preferred the sloper side of this hold over the flat as I found a more comfortable position for reps.

Around a year later I’ve now got a full production 1×5 Base Station with Jug ‘n’ Sloper and Slot 20 modules installed in the house. It’s above a door so very easy to get into a routine of a few quick reps as I pass from kitchen to living room.

The modules slide even better with the production variant, no need to slap and wiggle them – pop it in and it’s solid! The ability to rotate the modules is still unmatched by anything on the market and makes exercises such as typewriters or frenchies one hell of a lot more challenging by demanding more from the triceps and lats. They’ve even recently been working with external coaches and climbers including Steve McClure to produce some innovative module shapes.

In all an impressive piece of kit that will instantly lead the industry as a training tool accessible to both new climbers keen to push their grades and learn about training, and elite climbers wanting the best tool to complement their training regime. Price-wise it can be seen as a little steep but it’s well worth the quality of training one can get from this kit, I would recommend buying a base station and then picking your own modules to get the most out of it.

Creator Rob has been touring up and down the UK, including demo-ing at the IFSC event at RATHO! Be sure to check out their instagram @sadalienclimbing for updates on where he’ll be so you can go and have a good play on it and pick his brain. Rob is the perfect champion for the kit’s results because he’s just become ripped over the last year mainly from endless demonstrations!

Tap Brian Challenge!

www.sadalienclimbing.com
Launch kit from £135
Modules from £48

Advice: Caring for Your Kit

This page is a guide on how to look after your kit. If, like me, you have redonkulously expensive taste in kit and will bravely dish out £150 on any ‘gucci’ piece of gear then you will want to look after and maintain it in order to get your money’s worth.

*Disclaimer 1: The methods or products I suggest are purely based on my experience through doing, or learning from my customers/colleagues/friends that have done it wrong.*
*Disclaimer 2: When machine washing any piece of gear with a specialist product please clean out the detergent tray and run a rinse cycle with a towel just to flush out any excess detergent residue. This way the products will treat your gear exactly how they’re meant to.*

Waterproofs:
Your first line of defence against the epic fury of mother nature. Any WP jacket or trousers worth more than 80 quid will require a level of care over its lifetime. The majority of items are pre-treated with a DWR (Durable Water Repellent) coating and this, along with the fabric, is what causes the water to ‘bead’ and run off the garment. Over time this beading will soon be replaced by ‘wetting out’, this is where water doesn’t bead but seeps into the face fabric causing the dark, wet patches.
To care for your WPs you will need to wash them in a ‘pure soap’ such as Nikwax Tech Wash. Do not use any form of detergent wash on your WPs, detergents work by drawing water into and through clothing in order to wash them, this is very bad for a WP! Once washed, leave to drip dry, or tumble dry on a low heat if the care label allows.
If, after washing, wetting out still happens then you’ll want to re-proof the jacket using something like Nikwax TX Direct. Once washed, drip dry. A general rule is that for every 3 washes, do a re-proof.

Boots:
Your boots keep your feet in good working order. If your boot fails you then, ultimately, you fail.
Boot care is simple, but very often overlooked. If you don’t look after them then they will crack and/or fall apart. After a good muddy romp then be sure to take out the laces and scrub them in lukewarm water to get all the debris and muck off.
Once dried then it’s best to apply either a wax or cream for leather boots. If a wax then it’s best to rub in with fingers as the warmth speeds up the process of the oils seeping into the leather. Once applied then either give a quick buff to work it in or leave until they’re needed again. Should you go for an extended period in between using your boots then it is worth applying a good coating of wax/cream before storing the boots as this gives plenty of nourishment and hydration to the materials and keeps them from drying out, degrading or rotting whilst out of action.
A well kept pair of boots will give you many years of faithful and comfortable service regardless of what torture you may put them through.

If a synthetic boot with a waterproof membrane then after they’ve been washed leave to dry and they’ll be good to go again. There are gel products such as Nikwax footwear cleaning gel that help keep everything in good shape.

Rope:
REI has a great page on rope advice. In my experience it is best not to bung a rope in the washing machine as it can twist the sheath from the core and leave you with a knotted, lumpy mess

Sleeping Bags:
The easiest way to care for your sleeping bag is to use a sleeping bag liner inside it. This way you only have to chuck the liner in the wash instead of the whole bag.
For a synthetic fill bag then it is easy to put in the washing machine and put on a cool synthetic wash using Tech Wash or similar.
If it’s a Down filled bag however life gets a lot harder as once down feathers get wet, they lose their loft abilities (ability to capture air within them) and are difficult to dry them out properly. Down bags can last for atleast a decade if looked after properly, but washing them is a bugger. It is best to find a specialised Down Washing company.
Storage of your sleeping bag is equally important for keeping it warm and effective. Instead of having it tightly packed away in its stuff sack, it is best to have it in a storage sack of some sort, or even hung up in a wardrobe without compressing it at all. Most higher priced bags will have one with it, but something like a large pillowcase with work equally well. The reason for this is that when a sleeping bag is compressed for a long period, the loft qualities of the fill begin to degrade and you begin losing out on that all important warmth.

Tents:
Your primary shelter, look after these things and they will serve you for years to come. There are countless shapes, sizes, material types, pole materials, and uses.
I won’t cover the fabric army 9×9 style tents as nobody is stupid enough to go hiking with one of those bad boys strapped to your back.
UV is a particular killer of tents, leave it exposed to the sun for too long and the materials will start to degrade and their waterproofing and strength will be compromised, as with any pitching site be sure that its sheltered from the elements as well as offering some shade. Tent materials can be washed according to care labels, Nikwax Tent and Gear Solarproof should be used in the same fashion as TX Direct (see Waterproofs) it keeps tents and gear well maintained for the environments that we will exposed gear to. For standard washing then Tech Wash is perfect.
If you have forked out for a fairly basic tent that uses fibreglass poles then take care with them as they are by no means as strong, lightweight or durable as the anodised alu poles that are commonplace with many higher-end tents. Should they snap they can be replaced but not repaired. A temporary fix can be fashioned using the repair kit usually provided but will not provide a long term solution. Fibreglass pole replacements are becoming harder to find and so in the long run it is better to for out a little extra for a better quality tent.
A key maintenance tip for any and all tents is DO NOT STORE IT WET. A wet tent stored will just rot and become a useless waste of money. Once you have finished your trip, stand up the tent in your bedroom/living room/wherever and leave it over night to dry out, then pack it away when dry.

Feel free to contribute methods and tips that you have found particularly useful throughout your adventures. Everyone has a little gem for dealing with their beloved equipment!